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    Tempered glass

    Tempered glass

    New postby insight on Mon Oct 19, 2009 3:19 pm

    What is the effective date for tempered glass in windows next to a bathtib and or jacuzzi for single family residence? A Code reference number would be appreciated.
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    Re: Tempered glass

    New postby Jerry Peck - Codeman on Mon Oct 19, 2009 7:22 pm

    First, just letting you know these are not "Private Questions" (which are set up to be password protected and not accessible to others - and only so for very specific reasons).

    I will move this to the appropriate forum for the answer, okay?
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    Re: Tempered glass

    New postby Jerry Peck - Codeman on Mon Oct 19, 2009 9:48 pm

    What code(s) has been adopted for your area?

    With that, I can possibly track back to when safety glass became a requirement.

    However, generally speaking, the furthest back I have traced safety glass in houses, sliding glass doors, tub and shower enclosures, etc., is to 1965 in the Los Angeles/Orange County area, more specifically Orange County I believe, effective by ordinance in January 1965, but not yet in the building code.
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    Re: Tempered glass

    New postby insight on Tue Oct 20, 2009 1:26 pm

    North Carolina
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    Re: Tempered glass

    New postby Jerry Peck - Codeman on Tue Oct 20, 2009 2:59 pm

    North Carolina uses the ICC codes, and (for the most part) used to use the Standard Codes from SBCCI.

    The oldest Standard Building Code I currently have is the 1988 edition, which includes enclosure and glazing around bath tubs and showers in the hazardous locations which require safety glass - and it was not a new section to that 1988 edition, meaning that it goes back in time to previous editions.
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    Re: Tempered glass

    New postby insight on Thu Oct 22, 2009 3:41 pm

    Any other updates?
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    Re: Tempered glass

    New postby Jerry Peck - Codeman on Thu Oct 22, 2009 3:49 pm

    No updates.

    As I stated, safety glass was required back to, and prior to, the 1988 Standard Building Code.

    A search of the old codes at what is now the ICC would be needed, which would involve time and expense, if you would like me to do so.
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    Re: Tempered glass

    New postby insight on Thu Oct 22, 2009 4:53 pm

    Thanks.
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    Re: Tempered glass

    New postby Murray on Wed Jan 28, 2015 10:49 pm

    What is tyhe minimum sill height for apartment unit windows on the first floor. I know second floor has to be 24" AFF but I have several plans that are 1'-8" on the first floor. Do these windows need to be tempered or is this allowed on first floor? Thanks
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    Re: Tempered glass

    New postby Jerry Peck - Codeman on Wed Jan 28, 2015 11:36 pm

    Murray wrote:What is tyhe minimum sill height for apartment unit windows on the first floor. I know second floor has to be 24" AFF but I have several plans that are 1'-8" on the first floor. Do these windows need to be tempered or is this allowed on first floor? Thanks


    First, some presumptions: a) the windows are not close to a door; b) the windows are not adjacent to a wet area; c) the windows are not at the bottom of stairs.

    The following is from the 2012 IBC, however, there as been very little change in these sections for a very long time: (underlining and bold are mine)
    - 2406.4 Hazardous locations.
    - - The locations specified in Sections 2406.4.1 through 2406.4.7 shall be considered specific hazardous locations requiring safety glazing materials.
    - - 2406.4.1 Glazing in doors.
    - - - Glazing in all fixed and operable panels of swinging, sliding, and bifold doors shall be considered a hazardous location.
    - - - - Exceptions:
    - - - - - 1. Glazed openings of a size through which a 3-inch-diameter (76 mm) sphere is unable to pass.
    - - - - - 2. Decorative glazing.
    - - - - - 3. Glazing materials used as curved glazed panels in revolving doors.
    - - - - - 4. Commercial refrigerated cabinet glazed doors.
    - - 2406.4.2 Glazing adjacent to doors.
    - - - Glazing in an individual fixed or operable panel adjacent to a door where the nearest vertical edge of the glazing is within a 24-inch (610 mm) arc of either vertical edge of the door in a closed position and where the bottom exposed edge of the glazing is less than 60 inches (1524 mm) above the walking surface shall be considered a hazardous location.
    - - - - Exceptions:
    - - - - - 1. Decorative glazing.
    - - - - - 2. Where there is an intervening wall or other permanent barrier between the door and glazing.
    - - - - - 3. Where access through the door is to a closet or storage area 3 feet (914 mm) or less in depth. Glazing in this application shall comply with Section 2406.4.3.
    - - - - - 4. Glazing in walls on the latch side of and perpendicular to the plane of the door in a closed position in one- and two-family dwellings or within dwelling units in Group R-2.
    - - 2406.4.3 Glazing in windows.
    - - - Glazing in an individual fixed or operable panel that meets all of the following conditions shall be considered a hazardous location:
    - - - - 1. The exposed area of an individual pane is greater than 9 square feet (0.84 m2);
    - - - - 2. The bottom edge of the glazing is less than 18 inches (457 mm) above the floor;
    - - - - 3. The top edge of the glazing is greater than 36 inches (914 mm) above the floor; and
    - - - - 4. One or more walking surface(s) are within 36 inches (914 mm), measured horizontally and in a straight line, of the plane of the glazing.
    - - - - - Exceptions:
    - - - - - - 1. Decorative glazing.
    - - - - - - 2. Where a horizontal rail is installed on the accessible side(s) of the glazing 34 to 38 inches (864 to 965 mm) above the walking surface. The rail shall be capable of withstanding a horizontal load of 50 pounds per linear foot (730 N/m) without contacting the glass and be a minimum of 1 1/2 inches (38 mm) in cross-sectional height.
    - - - - - - 3. Outboard panes in insulating glass units or multiple glazing where the bottom exposed edge of the glass is 25 feet (7620 mm) or more above any grade, roof, walking surface or other horizontal or sloped (within 45 degrees of horizontal) (0.78 rad) surface adjacent to the glass exterior.
    - - 2406.4.4 Glazing in guards and railings.
    - - - Glazing in guards and railings, including structural baluster panels and nonstructural in-fill panels, regardless of area or height above a walking surface shall be considered a hazardous location.
    - - 2406.4.5 Glazing and wet surfaces.
    - - - Glazing in walls, enclosures or fences containing or facing hot tubs, spas, whirlpools, saunas, steam rooms, bathtubs, showers and indoor or outdoor swimming pools where the bottom exposed edge of the glazing is less than 60 inches (1524 mm) measured vertically above any standing or walking surface shall be considered a hazardous location. This shall apply to single glazing and all panes in multiple glazing.
    - - - - Exception: Glazing that is more than 60 inches (1524 mm), measured horizontally and in a straight line, from the water's edge of a bathtub, hot tub, spa, whirlpool, or swimming pool.
    - - 2406.4.6 Glazing adjacent to stairs and ramps.
    - - - Glazing where the bottom exposed edge of the glazing is less than 60 inches (1524 mm) above the plane of the adjacent walking surface of stairways, landings between flights of stairs, and ramps shall be considered a hazardous location.
    - - - - Exceptions:
    - - - - - 1. The side of a stairway, landing or ramp that has a guard complying with the provisions of Sections 1013 and 1607.8, and the plane of the glass is greater than 18 inches (457 mm) from the railing.
    - - - - - 2. Glazing 36 inches (914 mm) or more measured horizontally from the walking surface.
    - - 2406.4.7 Glazing adjacent to the bottom stair landing.
    - - - Glazing adjacent to the landing at the bottom of a stairway where the glazing is less than 36 inches (914 mm) above the landing and within 60 inches (1524 mm) horizontally of the bottom tread shall be considered a hazardous location.
    - - - - Exception: Glazing that is protected by a guard complying with Sections 1013 and 1607.8 where the plane of the glass is greater than 18 inches (457 mm) from the guard.

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    I have pulled out the sections related to windows and posted them separately below - you have not provided enough information for me to know, however:
    - Do all of 1, 2, 3, and 4 apply to your locations?
    - Do the exceptions apply to your locations?

    - - 2406.4.3 Glazing in windows.
    - - - Glazing in an individual fixed or operable panel that meets all of the following conditions shall be considered a hazardous location:
    - - - - 1. The exposed area of an individual pane is greater than 9 square feet (0.84 m2);
    - - - - 2. The bottom edge of the glazing is less than 18 inches (457 mm) above the floor;
    - - - - 3. The top edge of the glazing is greater than 36 inches (914 mm) above the floor; and
    - - - - 4. One or more walking surface(s) are within 36 inches (914 mm), measured horizontally and in a straight line, of the plane of the glazing.
    - - - - - Exceptions:
    - - - - - - 1. Decorative glazing.
    - - - - - - 2. Where a horizontal rail is installed on the accessible side(s) of the glazing 34 to 38 inches (864 to 965 mm) above the walking surface. The rail shall be capable of withstanding a horizontal load of 50 pounds per linear foot (730 N/m) without contacting the glass and be a minimum of 1 1/2 inches (38 mm) in cross-sectional height.
    - - - - - - 3. Outboard panes in insulating glass units or multiple glazing where the bottom exposed edge of the glass is 25 feet (7620 mm) or more above any grade, roof, walking surface or other horizontal or sloped (within 45 degrees of horizontal) (0.78 rad) surface adjacent to the glass exterior.
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